Hubble peers inside a celestial geode

In this unusual image, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures a rare view of the celestial equivalent of a geode - a gas cavity carved by the stellar wind and intense ultraviolet radiation from a young hot star.

Real geodes are handball-sized, hollow rocks that start out as bubbles in volcanic or sedimentary rock. Only when these inconspicuous round rocks are split in half by a geologist, do we get a chance to appreciate the inside of the rock cavity that is lined with crystals. In the case of Hubble's 35 light-year diameter "celestial geode" the transparency of its bubble-like cavity of interstellar gas and dust reveals the treasures of its interior.

Credit:

ESA/NASA, Yäel Nazé (University of Liège, Belgium) and You-Hua Chu (University of Illinois, Urbana, USA)

About the Image

NASA caption
Id:heic0413a
Type:Observation
Release date:12 August 2004, 15:00
Related releases:heic0413
Size:1231 x 696 px

About the Object

Name:LHA 120-N 44F, N44F
Type:• Local Universe : Nebula : Appearance : Emission : H II Region
• X - Nebulae Images/Videos
Distance:150000 light years
Constellation:Dorado

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
Sii
673 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
Pseudogreen
Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
H-alpha
656 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2

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