Feeling blue

This captivating image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 shows a lonely dwarf galaxy, a staggering 100 million light-years away from Earth. This image depicts the blue compact dwarf galaxy ESO 338-4, which can be found in the constellation of Corona Australis (the Southern Crown).

Blue compact dwarf galaxies take their name from the intensely blue star-forming regions that are often found within their cores. One such region can be seen embedded in ESO 338-4, which is populated with bright young stars voraciously consuming hydrogen. These massive stars are doomed to a short existence, as despite their vast supplies of hydrogen fuel. The nuclear reactions in the cores of these stars will burn through these supplies in only millions of years — a mere blink of an eye in astronomical terms.

The young blue stars nestled within a cloud of dust and gas in the centre of this image are the result of a recent galaxy merger between a wandering galaxy and ESO 388-4. This galactic interaction disrupted the clouds of gas and dust surrounding ESO 338-4 and led to the rapid formation of a new population of stars.

Credit:

ESA/Hubble & NASA

About the Image

Id:potw1845a
Type:Observation
Release date:5 November 2018, 06:00
Size:2273 x 2449 px

About the Object

Name:ESO 338-4
Type:Local Universe : Galaxy : Size : Dwarf
Distance:100 million light years
Constellation:Sagittarius
Category:Galaxies

Image Formats

Large JPEG
1.3 MB
Screensize JPEG
259.4 KB

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224.1 KB
1280x1024
365.1 KB
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525.5 KB
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631.4 KB
2048x1536
830.6 KB

Coordinates

Position (RA):19 27 58.74
Position (Dec):-41° 34' 29.51"
Field of view:1.89 x 2.04 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 8.7° left of vertical

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Ultraviolet
UV (Ly-α)
127 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
O III
500 nm Hubble Space Telescope
STIS
Optical
V
550 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Ultraviolet
very broad (BaF2)
152 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
O III
500 nm Hubble Space Telescope
STIS
Infrared
J
1.1 μm Hubble Space Telescope
WFC3

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