Spotlight on IC 3583

This delicate blue group of stars — actually an irregular galaxy named IC 3583 — sits some 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin).

It may seem to have no discernable structure, but IC 3583 has been found to have a bar of stars running through its centre. These structures are common throughout the Universe, and are found within the majority of spiral, many irregular, and some lenticular galaxies. Two of our closest cosmic neighbours, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, are barred, indicating that they may have once been barred spiral galaxies that were disrupted or torn apart by the gravitational pull of the Milky Way.

Something similar might be happening with IC 3583. This small galaxy is thought to be gravitationally interacting with one of its neighbours, the spiral Messier 90. Together, the duo form a pairing known as Arp 76. It’s still unclear whether these flirtations are the cause of IC 3583’s irregular appearance — but whatever the cause, the galaxy makes for a strikingly delicate sight in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, glimmering in the blackness of space.

Credit:

ESA/Hubble & NASA

About the Image

Id:potw1648a
Type:Observation
Release date:28 November 2016, 06:00
Size:3992 x 3936 px

About the Object

Name:IC 3583
Type:Local Universe : Galaxy : Type : Irregular
Distance:30 million light years
Constellation:Virgo
Category:Galaxies

Image Formats

Large JPEG
5.7 MB
Screensize JPEG
238.6 KB

Zoomable


Wallpapers

1024x768
215.5 KB
1280x1024
376.5 KB
1600x1200
613.6 KB
1920x1200
831.4 KB
2048x1536
1.1 MB

Coordinates

Position (RA):12 36 44.64
Position (Dec):13° 15' 24.14"
Field of view:3.32 x 3.28 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 57.0° left of vertical

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
V
606 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
V
606 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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