Hubble Space Telescope: Kepler's Supernova Remnant (close-up, visible-light data)

Four hundred years ago a "new star" appeared in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of the nearby planets. In fact this 'new star' was a supernova, now named Kepler's supernova, and was the last such object seen to explode in our Milky Way galaxy. Seen here are some of its remains.

This image was taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with filters onboard to isolate visible light emitted by hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in the remnant but let through starlight from foreground and background stars. The image reveals in Kepler's supernova remnant the detailed knots, which are dense clumps that form behind the outward moving shock wave, and filamentary ribbons, which reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

 

Credit:

NASA, ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo0429l
Type:Observation
Release date:6 October 2004, 18:00
Size:2008 x 2496 px

About the Object

Name:Kepler's SN
Type:• Milky Way : Nebula : Type : Supernova Remnant
• X - Nebulae Images/Videos
Distance:13000 light years

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
Oiii
502 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
H-alpha + Nii
658 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
Nii
660 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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3.3 MB
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