New Hubble view of galaxy cluster Abell 1689

This new Hubble image shows galaxy cluster Abell 1689. It combines both visible and infrared data from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with a combined exposure time of over 34 hours (image on left over 13 hours, image on right over 20 hours) to reveal this patch of sky in greater and striking detail than in previous observations.

This image is peppered with glowing golden clumps, bright stars, and distant, ethereal spiral galaxies. Material from some of these galaxies is being stripped away, giving the impression that the galaxy is dripping, or bleeding, into the surrounding space. Also visible are a number of electric blue streaks, circling and arcing around the fuzzy galaxies in the centre.

These streaks are the telltale signs of a cosmic phenomenon known as gravitational lensing. Abell 1689 is so massive that it bends and warps the space around it, affecting how light from objects behind the cluster travels through space. These streaks are the distorted forms of galaxies that lie behind the cluster.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Blakeslee (NRC Herzberg Astrophysics Program, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory), and H. Ford (JHU)

About the Image

Id:heic1317a
Type:Observation
Release date:12 September 2013, 17:00
Related releases:heic1317
Size:4002 x 3863 px

About the Object

Name:Abell 1689, Virgo Cluster
Type:• Early Universe : Galaxy : Type : Gravitationally Lensed
• Early Universe : Galaxy : Grouping : Cluster
• X - Cosmology Images/Videos
Distance:2 billion light years

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
B
475 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
R
625 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
i
775 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
850
Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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Large JPEG
9.6 MB
Screensize JPEG
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1280x1024
521.1 KB
1600x1200
842.8 KB
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